the Collective Unconscious further Explored

Unconsciousness and its dimensions further explored. The below passage is from C.G. Jung’s memoir ‘Dreams, Memories, Reflections’. It mentions the importance of recognizing ethically the symbols within our collective unconscious during childhood and through adulthood, and how it shaped our personalities and ways we view our external reality to which creates pattern if behavior/thought. Further more this passage discusses the subtle irrational sensation once one dives into their unconsciousness and meet the mythological archetypes within us all. This travel is described through Jung’s description of the Individuation Process. Read more on this in my ‘PSYCHOLOGY & TOOLS DOR SELF-DEVELOPMENT’ category. No words can describe the inner travel when we journey into the depths of our collective mind. There is no such thing of a sure road without mistakes on this spirit journey. Be mindful of your thoughts and what you can learn from them. Synchronicity is true, and pay attention to the contents of your dreams. Our unconscious is a religious infinity beyond time and space.

“Consciousness began its evolution from an animal-like state which seems to us unconscious, and the same process of differentiation is repeated in every child.” – C.G. Jung

Jung dreams memories reflection

“It is equally a grave mistake to think that it is enough to gain some understanding of the images [of the collective unconscious] and that knowledge can here make a halt. Insight into them must be converted into an ethical obligation. Not to do so is to fall prey to the power principle, not only to others but even to the knower. The images of the unconscious place a great responsibility upon a man. Failure to understand them, or a shirking of ethical responsibility, deprives him of his wholeness and imposes a painful fragmentariness on his life.”

“A characteristic of childhood is that, thanks to naïveté and unconsciousness, it sketches a more complete picture of the self, of the whole man in his pure individuality, than adulthood. Consequently, the sight of a child or a primitive will arouse certain longings in adult, civilized persons – longings which relate to the unfulfilled desires and needs of those parts of the personality which have been blotted out of the total picture in favor of the adapted persona.”

“What happens within oneself when one integrates previously unconscious contents with the consciousness is something which can scarcely be described in words. It can only be experienced. It is a subjective affair quite beyond discussion; we have a particular feeling about ourselves, about the way we are, and that is a fact which it is neither possible nor meaningful to doubt. Similarly, we convey a particular feeling to others, and that too is a fact that cannot be doubted. So far as we know, there is no higher authority which could eliminate the probable discrepancies between all these impressions and opinions. Whether a change has taken place as the result of integration, and what the nature of that change is, remains a matter of subjective conviction. To be sure, it is not a fact which is in practice uncommonly important and fraught with consequences. Realistic psychotherapists, at any rate, and psychologist interested in therapy, can scarcely afford to overlook facts of this sort.”

“When one follows the path of individuation, when one lives one’s own life, one must take mistakes into the bargain; life would not be complete without them. There is no guarantee – not for a single moment – that we will not fall into error or stumble into deadly peril. We may think there is a sure road, but that would be the road of death. Then nothing happens any longer – at any rate, not the right things. Anyone who takes the sure road is as good as dead.”

“One must accept the thoughts that go on within oneself of their own accord as part of one’s reality. The categories of true and false are, of course, always present; but because they are not binding they take second place. The presence of thoughts is more important than our subjective judgment of them. But neither must these judgments be suppressed, for they also are existent thoughts which are part of our wholeness.”

“The unconscious helps by communicating things to us, or making figurative allusions. It has other ways, too, of informing us of things which by all logic we could not possibly know. Consider synchronistic phenomena, premonitions, and dreams that come true.”

UNCONSIOUS DEMENSIONS

“The psyche at times functions outside of the spatio-temporal law of causality. This indicates that our conceptions of space and time, and therefore of causality also, are incomplete. A complete picture of the world would require the addition of still another dimension; only then could the totality of phenomena be given a unified explanation. Hence it is that the rationalists insist to this day that Parapsychological experiences do not really exist; for there world-view stands or falls by this question. If such phenomena occur at all, the rationalistic picture of the universe is invalid, because incomplete. Then the possibility of an other-valued reality behind the phenomenal world becomes an inescapable problem, and we must face the fact that our world, with its time, space, and causality, relates to another order of things lying behind or beneath it, in which neither “here and there” nor “earlier and later” are of importance. The least a part of our psychic existence is characterized by a relativity of time and space. This relativity seems to increase, in proportion to the distance from consciousness, to an absolute condition of timelessness and spacelessness.”

“Unconscious wholeness therefore seems to me the true spiritus rector of all biological and psychic events. Here is a principle which strives for total realization – which in man’s case signifies the attainment of total consciousness. Attainment of consciousness is culture in the broadest sense, and self-knowledge is therefore the heart and essence of the process. The Oriental attributes unquestionably divine significance to the self, and according to the ancient Christian view self-knowledge is the road to knowledge of God.”

“The feeling for the infinite, however, can be attained only if we are bounded to the utmost. The greatest limitation for man is the “self”; it is manifested in the experience: “I am only that!” Only consciousness of our narrow confinement in the self forms the link to the limitlessness of the unconscious. In such awareness we experience ourselves concurrently as limited and eternal, as both the only and the other. In knowing ourselves to be unique in our personal combination – that is, ultimately limited – we possess also the capacity for becoming conscious of the infinite, but only then.”

“Consciousness is phylogenetically and ontogenetically a secondary phenomenon. Just as the body has an anatomical prehistory of millions of years, so also does the psychic system. And just as the human body today represents in each of its parts the result of this evolution, and everywhere still shows traces of its earlier stages – so the same may be said of the psyche. Consciousness began its evolution from an animal-like state which seems to us unconscious, and the same process of differentiation is repeated in every child. The psyche of the child in its preconscious state is anything but a tabula rasa; it is already preformed in a recognizably individual way, and is moreover equipped with all specifically human instincts, as well as with the priori foundations of the higher functions.

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