C.G. Jung Notes: Group Conformation

In late April  completed a course in my MSW program called Group Social Work, so this post is seemingly fitting, and it wasn’t even planned, since I planned my post a year in advance (I have a lot of writings saved on my computer, that I didn’t know what to do with, hence this blog was created). Synchronicity is an interesting thing.  [4.20.2018] Information found below in C.G. Jung’s collective works and  The Undiscovered Self

Post 5: group conformation

“By virtue of his reflective faculties, man is raised out of the animal world, and by his mind he demonstrates that nature has put a high premium precisely upon the development of consciousness. Through consciousness he takes possession of nature by recognizing the existence of the world and thus, as it were, confirming the Creator. The world becomes the phenomenal world, for without conscious reflection it would not be. If the Creator were conscious of Himself, he would not need conscious creatures; nor is it probably that the extremely indirect methods of creation, which squandered millions of years upon the development of countless species and creatures, are the outcome of purposeful intention. Natural history tells us of a haphazard and casual transformation of species over hundreds of millions of years of devouring and being devoured. The biological and political history of man is an elaborate repetition of the same thing. But the history of the mind offers a different picture. Here the miracle of reflection consciousness intervenes – the second cosmogony. The importance of consciousness is so great that one cannot help suspecting the element of meaning to be concealed somewhere within all the monstrous, apparently senseless biological turmoil, and that the road to its manifestation was ultimately found on the level of warm-blooded vertebrates possessed of a differentiated brain – found as if by chance, unintended and unforeseen, and yet somehow sensed, felt and groped for out of some dark urge.”

Group conformation – the loss of Self

“Reforms by advances, that is, by new methods or gadgets, are of course impressive at first, but in the long run they are dubious and in any case dearly paid for. They by no means increase the contentment or happiness of people on the whole. Mostly, they are deceptive sweetening’s of existence, like speedier communications which unpleasantly accelerate the tempo of life and leave us with less time than ever before. Ominis festinatio ex parte diaboli est all haste is of the devil, as the old masters use to say.

“Reforms by retrogressions, on the other hand, are as a rule less expensive and in addition more lasting, for they return to the simpler, tried and tested ways of the past and make the sparsest use of newspapers, radio, television, and all supposedly time saving innovations.”

“The decisive question for man is: Is he related to something infinite or not? That’s the telling question of his life. Only if we know that the thing which truly matters is the infinite can we avoid fixing our interest upon utilities, and upon all kinds of goals which aren’t of real importance. Thus we demand that the world grant us recognition for qualities which we regard as personal possessions: our talent or our beauty. The more a man lays stress on false possessions, and the less sensitivity he has for what is essential, the less satisfying is his life. He feels limited because he has limited aims, and the result Is envy and jealousy. If we understand and feel that here in this life we already have a link with the infinite, desires and attitudes change. In the final analysis, we count for something only because of the essential we embody, and if we do not embody that, life is wasted. In our relationships to other men, too, the crucial question is weather an element of boundlessness is expressed in the relationship.”

“Our age has shifted all emphasis to the here and now, and thus brought about a demonetization of man and his world. The phenomenon of dictators and all the misery they have wrought springs from the fact that man has been robbed of transcendence by the shortsightedness of the super-intellectuals. Like them, he has fallen a victim to unconsciousness. But man’s task is the exact opposite: to become conscious of the contents that press upward from the unconscious. Neither should he persist in his unconsciousness, nor remain identically with the unconscious elements of his being, thus evading his destiny, which is to create more and more consciousness. As far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light in the darkness of mere being. It may even be assumed that just as the unconscious affects us, so the increase in our consciousness affects the unconscious.”

The Undiscovered Self – C.G. Jung

“The gift of reason and critical reflection is not one of man’s outstanding peculiarities, and even where it exists it proves to be wavering and inconstant, the more so, as a rule, the bigger the political groups are.”

One thought on “C.G. Jung Notes: Group Conformation

  1. Pingback: Year 4: Life, Reflections, Myths, Psyche | Inside A Soul

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